The Solitary Rambler

HIGH TIME IN HEBDEN BRIDGE
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Filmed 4th May 2015
Post-production completed 17th May 2015
Running time 20 minutes
Synopsis
 
Hebden Bridge  was one of those places I knew absolutely nothing about apart from perhaps seeing the name on maps and signposts. However, my interest increases as I begin to find out more about the town. During today’s walk I explain what helped me decide to finally discover Hebden Bridge for myself.....
Locations
 
Filmed in the South Pennines in the county of  West Yorkshire . Locations include  Hebden Bridge , the  Rochdale Canal  and  Heptonstall .
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Background and production details
 
The Taxi Driver ” had made two videos of walks in and around  Hebden Bridge , so after watching them on YouTube I decided that I wanted to visit the area too. I made my first, but brief visit in April 2014 and found that I really liked the town, so I thought it would be a great place to make a film of “The Solitary Rambler”. I decided to name the film “High Time in Hebden Bridge” as I felt it was indeed “high time” that I made my visit to Hebden Bridge!

On the 4th May 2015 I made my journey to Hebden Bridge. I left home at around 7.00am arriving at my destination at approximately 9.00am. The streets of the town were fairly quiet at that time, so I managed to get some good shots where I could talk in front of the camera without being distracted by too many people about. Unfortunately I was trying to record a scene in front of the old packhorse bridge, but a busker had started performing on Bridge Gate, the main street in the town centre, so as soon as I started speaking my lines loud music and singing kept bursting out in the background! It was very pleasant to hear I must say, but I had to give up what I was trying to do and move to another location away a few streets away.

After filming around the town centre I walked down to the  Rochdale Canal  as I wanted to take some shots along the towpath, at which most of the filming would be around Hebble End. I particularly wanted to film here as I knew this was a major location used in “ Joe and the Sheep Rustlers ”. I followed the canal towpath until I reached the  Pennine Way , which I then followed northbound climbing up steeply above the  Calder Valley . The climb was long and strenuous, but the terrain finally leveled out more as I crossed Badger Lane near  Blackshaw Head  to the top of Pry Hill before dropping down the other side to  Colden Water . I left the Pennine Way here to walk along part of the  Calderdale Way  as far as  Heptonstall .

I did a lot of filming in the lovely Heptonstall before dropping down steeply back into Hebden Bridge. I just did a couple more shots around here including the Buttress, the steep cobbled lane from Heptonstall before deciding to finish the day with a scene along New Road. I wanted to copy the opening scene of “Joe and the Sheep Rustlers”, where  Struan Rodger  walks up this road with the view of Hebden Bridge behind him, so I replicated this as much as I could with a similar shot of me walking up the lane with the same backdrop where I thank “The Taxi Driver”.

This wasn't the last scene I shot, however, as I ended up filming a few shots of the  Hare and Hounds Inn  at  Wadsworth , just up the hill from Hebden Bridge, where I decided to have a meal before heading home after the day’s filming. Once I did get home I recorded a few shots of my computer with “Joe and the Sheep Rustlers” on YouTube as well as a few segments of one of the  Hebden Bridge videos  made by “The Taxi Driver” and shots of their website.

For many of the scenes I had filmed within the town centre of Hebden Bridge I could hear loud music in the background from the buskers, so when it came to editing I had to do a considerable amount of overdubbing! This didn’t prove too difficult, however, as all I did was copy the sounds from other town centre scenes without the background music and paste them onto the scenes with the music. Back in the days of VHS editing this would have been a much more difficult and laborious task!

During my first visit to Hebden Bridge in April 2014 a couple of musical chords came into my head, so I developed that into part of the musical soundtrack I composed for “High Time in Hebden Bridge”. This was the sequence I used for when I was walking along the towpath of the Rochdale Canal and the steep climb up part of the Pennine Way. However, I created a completely new and ultimately much more personally satisfying soundtrack for the majority of the other scenes in the film.
 
 
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